Vaccinations

It is advised that all dogs and cats be fully vaccinated against the harmful and potentially fatal diseases that we are able to vaccinate against.

During our vaccination consultations our veterinarians will discuss/educate and advise you of what is best required as a part of your individual loved ones preventative regime.

Annual vaccine boosters for adult dogs and cats are as follows: 

Dogs: C5 (Parvovirus/ Distemper/ Hepatitis/ Parainfluenza virus/ Bordetella bronchiseptica)
+ Optimal recommendation for Proheart injection which is an annual injection to protect against heartworm.

Cats: F4 (Enteritis/Herpesvirus/Calicivirus/Chlamydophila) and FIV (feline aids)

Vaccination regime for kittens and puppies begin at 6-8 weeks then monthly boosters are given for 2 further months.

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More information

What does the C5 vaccine cover for?

Parvovirus, Distemper, Canine Infectious Hepatitis, Bordetella and Canine parainfluenza virus.

 

How often do I need to vaccinate my pet?

Once your cat or dog reaches adulthood we recommend they receive annual adult boosters to provide adequate levels of protection against disease transmission. This annual consultation also offers an opportunity for the veterinarian to provide a thorough health exam.

What's the vaccination regime for a puppy or kitten?

  • 1st puppy vaccination: 6-8 weeks.
  • 2nd puppy vaccination: 12 weeks.
  • 3rd puppy vaccination: 16 weeks.

How much does it cost?

$98 which includes an hour consultation with one of our vets, nose to tail health examination and vaccine. There are no additional cost for at home consultations. 

What is the FIV vaccine?

Protects your cat from contracting feline immunodeficiency virus.
Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) is a viral disease which affects the immune system of domestic cats. Whilst FIV cannot be transferred to humans, it acts in the same way as the human form of HIV, destroying the immune system and leaving a cat susceptible to infections and disease. Once the cat has been infected, FIV can then progress to feline acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, otherwise known as Feline AIDs.

Outdoor cats are at the highest risk of disease, especially if they fight with other cats.

Are there any side effects or reactions?

The benefits of vaccinations far outweigh any risks.
Adverse reactions to vaccines are very rare.

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Great team of vets and nurses here. They’ve looked after our golden retrievers for 4 years now and we couldn’t fault them. Very professional, full of knowledge and love for your family pets.

- Ellie Crisp